Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature

Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
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Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Home : People Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature

 

 

 

TERRY LANE

PROVOKING THOUGHT

OR PLAIN PROVOCATIVE

On page 64 of my book, Cleary Independent (1998 HarperCollins), I wrote the following:

Sadly, the minute women arced up about violence and the manner it was dealt with in the courts, the apologists were quickly out of the blocks. In 1994, SBS Television screened an hysterical, revisionist documentary, Deadly Hurt, which tortuously unravelled the thesis that the `Women's Movement' was emasculating men, and that the origins of a tragic murder-suicide could be traced to the possessive mother of the killer.

Selective editing, the pious monotone narrative of the producer and ghoulish use of Chinese Cultural Revolution imagery, converged in a series of thoughts and images which reinforced the misogynist premises women confronted in the Criminal Justice system. It was all to familiar. Unfortuantely, the people behind the production seemed to foolishly think theirs was a dissenter's view.

In reality, Deadly Hurt was the quintessential expression of the legal orthodoxy which browbeat the families of dead women when they gathered in court to honour a sister.

Melbourne broadcaster Terry Lane, an ardent opponent of most feminist proclamations, was almost delirious when Deadly Hurt arrived......

 

THE AGE ARTICLE - 10 YEARS ON

In the wake of the Ramage murder trial and the discussion about the law of provocation, Terry Lane wrote a piece for The Age. He called for the abolition of provocation. Along the way he made some 'interesting' observations. This is a short response.

It's not surprising that in the face of unequivocal evidence, Terry Lane, (THE AGE - Provoking the course of Rough Justice - 21/11/04) can't admit that the law of provocation discriminates against women. Against overwhelming evidence, Lane has for years scoffed at the argument that male violence towards women in the home is a profound problem.

The claim that Helen Garner's book about the killing of a man, Joe Cinque, by his girlfriend, is a 'counter balance to the notion that laws that excuse murders always favour men' is more of the same. The law of provocation is misogynist and extinguishes a woman's rights. That's a fact, not a notion. Furthermore, Garner throws no light on the hypocrisy of the law as it applies to male and female killers. The killing of Joe Cinque by his girlfriend creates no less pain and suffering, and is every bit as serious as the killing of Julie Ramage. However, it's misleading to suggest these cases were played out the same in court. Joe Cinque was never accused of having caused his girlfriend to kill him.

So convincingly was Julie Ramage blamed for causing her husband to kill her, Lane falls into the trap of saying 'taunting about sexual performance is no excuse for killing the tormentor'. It was only alleged that Julie Ramage said sex with her husband 'repulsed' her. The court was left with no doubt that she was an obedient, even subservient wife to a bullying husband. Of course, the court wasn't told that he'd broken her nose in 1991. And if one alleged derogatory comment in twenty-three years makes her a tormentor, what hope do women have, with or without the abolition of provocation?


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