Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature

Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
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Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Home : People Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature

 

 

 

Tuppence Moran and

The Coburg Football Club

In the days when Alan Tripp was president at Coburg and I was the coach Tuppence Moran was a regular at our games. It was a time VFA football was very popular on Sundays with people from the racing fraternity and Alan was a very prominent bookmaker; an SP bookmaker, they said!

I well remember a confrontation in the rooms one night after a game against Port Melbourne in 1986 when Tuppence entered the foray. Stuart Hicks had taken exception to that feisty rover Brian Allison’s tactics against his brother, Ashley, who was a star player with Port. The skirmish was over within minutes but it had the capacity to escalate. ‘Tuppence, he could fight like a thrashing machine in his younger days. I’m glad he took the bloke away,’ someone had quipped as Tuppence led his man out of the social club.

These days Brian Allison and Ashley Hicks laugh about that night in the social club. Despite his team winning by 14 points Port coach Peter Chisnall wasn’t smiling. Chisnall, who played in North Melbourne’s 1975 premiership side, had some harsh words to say about Allison. ‘He was talking about an inquiry into how I’d supposedly eye-gouged Ashley Hicks. All I’d done was rub some mud into Hicks’s face,’ says Brian.

Enter Alphonse and Lewis

We all look back with humour on those days at Coburg when emerging gangsters such as Alphonse Gangitano and Lewis Moran – who was always exceedingly polite – rubbed shoulders with players born and bred in the north of Melbourne. Few were strangers to a bit of biff and bash. Two years after that stoush at Coburg Tuppence’s nephew Jason would bite off a piece of a Coburg official’s ear at the Prince of Wales Hotel, in Ascot Vale, a few kilometres from the cafÈ where his uncle was shot dead on Monday 15 June 2009.

Furlan’s car explodes

How could we have imagined that one of our own, club sponsor John Furlan would be blown to pieces by an explosion in his car in Coburg on 3 August 2009, a year after Jason Moran shot dead Gangitano? Furlan could be gruff and antagonistic and was known to complain about the state of the world. But he seemed harmless. So too, did the Quadara bloke whom our 1982 coach Harold Martin brought to the club. On 28 May 1998 his brother, Joseph Quadara was shot dead in Toorak, another casualty in the underworld war.

Crocodile tears?

‘Fancy Judy Moran crying over Tuppence’. That was the catch-cry around the northern suburbs when Judy was reported in the media as having appeared, distraught, at the site of her brother-in-law’s murder. Another regular at Coburg in the mid to late ‘80s Judy is now in custody, charged as an accessory after the fact. Everyone says she’d fallen out with Tuppence. That doesn’t make her guilty, but it surely adds spice to the mystery!

Mincha Street, West Brunswick, where Judy Moran is alleged to have left the getaway car.

Postscript:

Only a select group of people know that it was Lewis Moran, wearing a balaclava, who robbed Alan Tripp at gun point in his ‘betting’ flat at the rear of his Princes Street house in Flemington in the mid ‘80s. One day that story will see the light of day. So too will the story that underworld figure Dennis Allen had threatened to kill former footballer ‘Crackers’ Keenan because of derisive comments he made about the great Port Melbourne player, Fred Cook, who was at that time, due to a drug habit, in Allen’s circle of friends.

 

 

 

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