Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature

Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
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Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Home : Music : Graffiti Tongue Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature


 

CHRISTY MOORE 

GRAFFITI TONGUE

Twenty five years after Christy Moore, Liam O'Flynn, Andy Irvine, Dónal Lunny and their band Planxty harnessed the words of Woody Guthrie and the reels of antiquity to the modern form, ushering in a musical renaissance in Ireland, Christy continues to produce songs of unbridled historical, political and spiritual breadth.

Beginning with 'Yellow Triangle', a lament to the apathy and political cowardice that accompanied the rise of Nazism, his latest CD 'Graffiti tongue' is an eclectic journey inspired by that characteristically powerful guitar and a legendary voice that paints pictures so vivid, tears well at every crossroad.

'North and South of the River', written in collaboration with Bono and The Edge from U2, will take its place with Phil Coulter's 'The Town I Loved So Well' as the most poignant cry for reconciliation of the tragedy of Northern Ireland.

A long time republican, when Christy sets his voice to work on lyrics such as: 'Can we stop playing these old tattoos/Darling, I don't have the answers/I want to meet you where you are/I don't need you to surrender', then turns his tongue in 'Minds Locked Shut' to the British Army's indefensible killing of 14 civilians in Derry on 'Bloody Sunday' 1972, it's a singularly moving experience.

Along the journey there are excursions deep into the spirit of Celtic history in the fiery 'God Woman', a gentle lampooning of the British who 'never claimed George Best' but had the nerve to ordain Irish Nobel Prize winning poet 'Seamus Heaney from Londonderry' as a 'British poet' in 'On the Mainland', and a eulogy to that icon of Irish rock music, Rory Gallagher, in 'Rory is Gone' (to play the Blues in Heaven).

It's not exactly party music, but as 'Graffiti tongue' confirms, few can deliver a song with the subtlety, passion and force of Christy Moore.



Philip Cleary
30 September, 1996
THE AGE GREEN GUIDE

 

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