Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature

Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
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Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Home : Literature : Jimmy Krakouer Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature

 

 

 

Brotherboys

By Sean Gorman

In August 2004, Jimmy Krakouer was released on parole from a Perth gaol. He'd served a total of 8 years and 3 months in gaol, after being convicted of drug trafficking. Krakouer's story, along with that of his brother Phil is told in a new book by Sean Gorman, titled Brotherboys. It's a sad tale really, for it's impossible to escape the fact that jimmy, for all his sins, suffered as a consequence of being a black. From the football field to the courts Jimmy Krakouer was a man whose defiance did him no good. Rather than canvass all the ideas in the book I'll recall a little story about Jimmy from the old VFA days that reflects the kind of bloke he is.

In the mid 80s Jimmy's brother Andrew was playing with Sandringham and was picked for the game against Coburg at the City Oval. I was coaching Coburg. It was peasant sunny day with a big, vocal crowd. Krakouer was only a youngster, but he was a stunning player capable of kicking brilliant goals. Brian Allison, a local bloke who'd played with Essendon U19s before crossing to Coburg in 1981, had been given the task of looking after Krakouer. A tough and skilful player, who went on to play state football with the VFA and was a member of the 88/89 premiership sides, Allison wasn't averse to throwing a punch.

From the first bounce, Allison's attention to Krakouer had the crowd roaring. A few more scuffles and a touch of brilliance from the Krakouer boy and it was a traditional take-no-prisoners VFA stoush. As always there were plenty of Krakouer relatives and friends on the terraces watching every move made by the young Krakouer and his 'tagger'. At quarter-time, Jimmy Krakouer decided he'd let Allison know just what he thought about his tactics. As the crowds left the huddle Krakouer made a beeline for the Coburg player. Words were exchanged and fists were raised, as the Krakouer family appeared to encircle Allison and the players in his vicinity. With his head characteristically tilted and in a quiet voice he gave Allison some advice. 'Touch my brother again and I'll be looking for you'.

'Listen Jimmy, Brian Allison's quite capable of taking you,' I said, when I caught sight of the impending fracas. Jimmy looked my way but didn't say a word. He only had eyes for Allison. Fortunately, that was as far as it went. Still it added an interesting dimension to the saga of brotherly love. Those were the days.

 

 

 


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