Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature

Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
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Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Home : History : Civil War Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature

 


THE IRISH CIVIL WAR

Brothers ands sisters arrested by the Free Staters

Number 40 Bath Street, Irishtown - the white house, 4th on the right - was the home of Denis and Philip Cleary who were arrested on 12 February 1923 and 3 March 1923 respectively.

 

Philip Cleary's records. Sent to the Curragh on 8 June 1923 and released on 12 December 1923.

 

Molly Cleary's name on a prison file in quasi-alphabetical order, alongside the Bath Street Clearys. I have no reason to think they were related..

 

The Cleary boys in 1931 - Phil (seated second from left) Patrick (third from left) and Dennis, at their feet - with Fontenoy Hurling Club.

 

 

Running in the family

It's remarkable how many sisters and brothers were arrested by the Free State Army. These names from the IRISH DAILY of 5 April 1923 offer a glimpse of the Free State Army's approach:

Coyle

Kathleen Coyle - 59 Aughrim Street, Dublin

Jeannie Coyle - ditto

Mary Coyle - 1 Mespin Road, Dublin

 

Doyle

Angela Doyle - 69 Rings Street, Inichore

Tessie Doyle - ditto

 

Farrell - Mrs Rogers - O'Harte

Dorothea Farrell - 24 Gardiner Place

Mrs Rogers - ditto

Bridie O'Harte - ditto

Freeman

Kathleen Freeman - 29 Sth William Street

Annie Freeman - ditto

The corner of Upper Dorset and Lower Dominick Streets - Republican stronghold.

 

Gleeson

Briedie Gleeson - 50 Lower Dominick Street

Nora Gleeson - Ditto

Margaret Gleeson - ditto -

(Note Maire Cleary signed Lily Gleeson's autograph book)

Lavery

Harriet Lavery - 13 North Earl Street

Mamie Lavery - ditto

Moloney

Cissie Moloney - 63 Foley Street

Bessie Moloney - 136 Leinster Road

Kathleen McIeney(sic) - 136 Leinster Road

 

O'Farrelly

Rita O'Farrelly - Oakley, Vernon Avenue

Annie O'Farrelly - ditto

 

O'Toole

Maura O'Toole - 9 Leinster Avenue

Jennie O'Toole - ditto

 

Robinson

Elizabeth Robinson - Harolds Cross

Sinead Robinson - ditto

 

Wilson - Plunkett

Mrs Wilson - 49 Philipsburg Avenue

Mrs Joseph (Grace) Plunkett - ditto

The five 'night birds' - Top landing B wing May Jones, Agnes Coyne, Angela Doyle, Mary Kenny, Jessie Doyle (Taken from Peg Fegan's autographed book)

More information coming

1923 IRA Hunger Strike

http://larkspirit.com/hungerstrikes/forgotten_strikes.htm

In Feb of 1923, 23 members of Cumann na mBan (including Mary and Annie MacSwiney, Lily Brennan and Nellie Ryan, sister-in-law of the Free State's Commander-in-Chief and Defence Minister Richard Mulcahy) went on strike for 34 days over illegal arrest and imprisonment without trial of prisoners. The strike resulted in the release of the women hunger-strikers.

On 23 May 1923, the Irish Civil War officially ended, but the state continued to go after republicans, keeping 12,000 men and women in prison and persecuting and harassing countless others. By October of 1923 tension was at an all-time high in the prisons and camps because of conditions and with no release in sight.

On 13 October 1923, Michael Kilroy, OC of the IRA POWs in Mountjoy, announced a mass strike by 300 prisoners and it soon spread to other jails, and within days 7,033 republicans were on hunger strike. The figures given by Sinn Fein at the time were ountjoy Jail 462; Cork Jail 70; Kilkenny Jail 350; Dundalk Jail 200; Gormanstown Camp 711; Newbridge Camp 1,700; Tintown 1,2,3, Curragh Camp 3,390; Harepark Camp 100; and, 50 women in the North Dublin Union.

NOTE

Maire Cleary was not only in Kilmainham during the 1923 strike but actively involved.

contact me: philcleary@bigpond.com

 

 

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