Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature

Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
vfl
afl
phil on...
politics
people
history
travel
music
literature
Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Home : History Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature

 

 

 

EGANSTOWN CEMETERY

VICTORIA AUSTRALIA

PICTURE OF BEAUTY AND VEIN OF WORLD HISTORY

Irish rebels, US Civil War Veteran Denis Sullivan, a Cleary who fought for the Pope against Garibaldi, the Swiss Italian publicans Andrea and Margherita La Franchi and the benefactor John Egan of Borrisoleigh: they are all here.

Egan's Celtic cross and one of Victoria's truly alluring cemeteries.

The Eganstown cemetery is tucked away on the Midland Highway, between Daylesford and Creswick, only a mile or so from Blampied. When they buried John and Johanna Cleary's 23-month-old daughter, Mary, on 12 March 1875, it was known as Blanket Flat. That month, no less than four children under two years of age were interred in the cemetery. Johanna's brother-in-law, Dinny Cleary, is there also. Dinny fought against Garibaldi on the side of the Pope. Bad career move! Did my great grandfather go with him? I wish I knew.

TO SEE MY VIDEO ON THE EGANSTOWN CEMETERY CLICK BELOW

 

 

 

 

Dinny Cleary's imperious family gave.

 

A Celtic cross for the Swiss Italian La Franchi family.

The La Franchis ran the Swiss Mountain Hotel, located just past the church. It was here, in 1898 the boys of Mount Prospect celebrated their premieship and received the twenty, silver 'La Franchi Medals'. Was this the first football team sponsored by an Italian immigrant?

Many of the boys of the Mount Prospect Football team pictured below are buried in the cemetery.

Mick 'punga' Cleary - two along from the bearded bloke with the medical bag - left Blampied for Brunswick in 1920.

I'd fancy that this photo would be circa 1898. It could be the premiership photo but I just don't know.

 

Some years ago I was shown one of the medals. I was told that it had belonged to 'Punga' Cleary's brother, Jack Cleary -see history menu - whose parents' grave is shown below. Jack was my grandfather. I can't spot anyone resembling him in the photo above.

If you happen to have one of the 20 silver medals, or know anything about them, please sent me an email at philcleary@bigpond.com

 

The Cleary grave at Eganstown.

Richard Ignatius O'Neill, who died at Passchendaele Belgium with the AIF, is also buried at Eganstown.

Passchendaele: As told in: http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/FWWpasschendaele.htm

The third major battle of Ypres, also known as the Battle of Passchendaele, took place between July and November, 1917. ........After a 10 day
preliminary bombardment, with 3,000 guns firing 4.25 million shells, the British offensive started at Ypres a 3.50 am on 31 July.

The German Fourth Army held off the main British advance and restricted the British to small gains on the left of the line. Allied attacks on the German front-line continued despite very heavy rain that turned the Ypres lowlands into a swamp. The situation was made worse by the fact that the British heavy bombardment had destroyed the drainage system in the area.

This heavy mud created terrible problems for the infantry and the use of tanks became impossible. Eventually Sir Douglas Haig called off the attacks and did not resume the offensive until late September. ....

As well as the heavy mud, the advancing British soldiers had to endure mustard gas attacks. ..... The offensive cost the British Expeditionary Force about 310,000 casualties. Sir Douglas Haig was severely criticised for continuing with the attacks long after the operation had lost any real strategic value.

Dinny Sullivan - American Civil War veteran - Co C 11th Massachusetts Inf Rgt.

 

The Caligaris of Eganstown

 

AND THE ROUSCH FAMILY FROM LUXEMBOURG

THEY KNEW JOHN F KENNEDY

Dear Phil

Thank you for your e-mail .. The Rousch members of the football team in your photograph are probably my grandfather's brothers or cousins. I will check this when I unearth my great-grandfather's death certificate, which is in our "archives".

Great grandfather, Nicholas Rousch, came out from Luxembourg around 1840. He married Bridget Darcy, the aunt of Les Darcy the boxer. Bridget came from Tipperary. My grandfather, Peter Rousch, was one of several children. He married Mary Dwyer, a cousin of the Kennedy clan one of whose offspring became president of the USA. The original Kennedys came from Ireland, with one of the boys emigrating to USA and the other to Australia. Grandma's brother, Jack Dwyer, was invited to the presidential inauguration in 1963 but age prevented him from attending. I remember old Aunt Mary Kennedy who lived in Albion Street, Brunswick. My grandparents lived in Donald Street, Brunswick next to the Kelly family who also came from the Mt Prospect/Blampied district.

My memories of the Cleary family are somewhat blurred but I did know a Molly Cleary and, I think, a Jack and Jim. The Cleary, Rousch, Kelly and Egan families seemed to be integrated through marriage and/or history and, as a child, I recall several outings. My earliest childhood memory of such was as a four or five year old being taken to the zoo by the families. Grandfather, never one to knock back a drink, made the group stop at the Moreland pub prior to us taking the cable tram to the zoo. I well remember the publican saying that the king had died and grandfather, a staunch republican and probable Sinn Feiner, called back "bugger the king"! I must have felt the same way, too, because I vividly recall that in honour of the king "Queenie" the elephant wasn't giving rides that day.

As I am now approaching my seventy-fifth birthday it must have been 1936.? I was born in Moreland Road at Vaucluse Hospital in 1931. I grew up in Thornbury where I was educated at St Mary's, Thornbury and later at "Parade College" East Melbourne. Ted Egan's family came from the same area as my grandparents hence Eganstown. We are related in some way but I never did try to work it out. His relatives frequented my grandparents' home in Donald Street. You should read his book "The Paper Boy's War" in which he describes his childhood and selling papers in the Brunswick/Coburg area during WW2.

Kind regards
Peter Rousch
Emeritus Professor
AM President
Friedreich Ataxia Research Association (Australasia)

June 2006


 

 

 
Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
[home]   [vfl]   [afl]   [world sport]   [politics]   [people]   [history]   [travel]   [music]   [literature]

© 2000 Phil Cleary Holdings
site by five