Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature

Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
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Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature
Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature Home : AFL Phil Cleary's view on Australian politics, people, vfl and afl football, music, history and literature

 

 

 

CRONULLA - THE SAME OLD STORY

MISOGYNY AND POWER AT WORK

Only the very naive would conclude that the event that engulfed Matthew Johns and the Cronulla Rugby League Club is a tale exclusively about football culture or that it is confined to rugby. Nor is this simply a tale about sexual morality. It’s about power and the underbelly of misogyny that afflicts our society.

Why wouldn’t some men believe they have a right to access a woman’s body once she’s apparently consented to sex with a couple of their teammates? Since time immemorial our rape and homicide laws have been afflicted by misogyny and the notion of women as chattels. How else could my sister’s killer – an ex-boyfriend – be found not guilty of murder after stabbing her to death in a Coburg street in 1987? How else could the DPP conclude that a sentence of less than four years in gaol ‘was not manifestly inadequate’?

The law of provocation – abolished in 2005 – encapsulated so much of what is wrong with the way our society deals with violence against women. If our courts could so easily blame a woman for being murdered, of course women could be blamed for being raped or for being in a room with 12 gorillas, otherwise known as footballers.

Here was a woman who appears to have consented to being with two men, only to find that there’s twelve blokes queuing up for sex. Where is the consent, implied or otherwise, in that? There is surely a question to be answered as far as consent is concerned. Just as importantly, there is a serious question to be asked as to why there aren’t enough good men around to stop men using their physical power in such gruesome ways.

 

 

 

 


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